Kerala’s solid waste management project faces major challenge – The New Indian Express

Express press service

THIRUVANANTHAPURAM: The implementation of the 2,300 crore Kerala Solid Waste Management Project (KSWMP) jointly funded by the World Bank and the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) is facing a huge challenge. The Herculean task before the government of Kerala is to acquire 130 acres of land required for the establishment of five sanitary landfills – the mandatory component – ​​to implement the project in the state.

“According to the standards set by the World Bank, the state will need at least five modern sanitary landfills of 25 to 30 acres each to implement the project. Depending on the conditions, landfills must be available within a radius of 80 to 100 km to facilitate the transport of waste. We have already identified about four sites. A feasibility study will be launched shortly. Kerala Enviro Infrastructure Ltd (KEIL) already runs a very successful landfill for the disposal of hazardous inert waste at Amabalamedu in Kochi. So we hope there will be no public resistance,” a KSWMP official said.

He said the landfill projects will only be implemented after convincing the public. “We will conduct a social impact study before launching the project,” an official said. The project, which will be implemented in 93 urban local communities across the state, will be implemented over a six-year period. However, the implementation is going to be a major challenge, as the project foresees the construction of modern sanitary landfills for the scientific disposal of daily waste generated in the state. According to officials, the first ever modern sanitary landfill under the KSWMP would see the light of day in Ambalamedu.

It is estimated that Kerala generates about 11,449 tons of solid waste per day, of which about 3,521 tons are generated in urban areas and 7,928 tons in rural areas. Local bodies in Kerala struggle to ensure scientific disposal of garbage due to lack of infrastructure and proper end-to-end system.

“Decentralized waste management is the current policy of the Government of Kerala and the KSWMP has been designed in such a way as to support and strengthen the existing system. But for 100% solid waste management, some centralized facilities are needed and landfills aim to bridge this gap and ensure that the waste management cycle is complete,” the official said.

THIRUVANANTHAPURAM: The implementation of the 2,300 crore Kerala Solid Waste Management Project (KSWMP) jointly funded by the World Bank and the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) is facing a huge challenge. The Herculean task before the government of Kerala is to acquire 130 acres of land required for the establishment of five sanitary landfills – the mandatory component – ​​to implement the project in the state. “According to the standards set by the World Bank, the state will need at least five modern sanitary landfills of 25 to 30 acres each to implement the project. Depending on the conditions, landfills must be available within a radius of 80 to 100 km to facilitate the transport of waste. We have already identified about four sites. A feasibility study will be launched shortly. Kerala Enviro Infrastructure Ltd (KEIL) already runs a very successful landfill for the disposal of hazardous inert waste at Amabalamedu in Kochi. So we hope there will be no public resistance,” a KSWMP official said. He said the landfill projects will only be implemented after convincing the public. “We will conduct a social impact study before launching the project,” an official said. The project, which will be implemented in 93 urban local communities across the state, will be implemented over a six-year period. However, the implementation is going to be a major challenge, as the project foresees the construction of modern sanitary landfills for the scientific disposal of daily waste generated in the state. According to officials, the first ever modern sanitary landfill under the KSWMP would see the light of day in Ambalamedu. It is estimated that Kerala generates about 11,449 tons of solid waste per day, of which about 3,521 tons are generated in urban areas and 7,928 tons in rural areas. Local bodies in Kerala struggle to ensure scientific disposal of garbage due to lack of infrastructure and proper end-to-end system. “Decentralized waste management is the current policy of the Government of Kerala and the KSWMP has been designed in such a way as to support and strengthen the existing system. But for 100% solid waste management, some centralized facilities are needed and landfills aim to bridge this gap and ensure that the waste management cycle is complete,” the official said.

Check Also

ISRI rejects ‘advanced recycling’ label, says plastic-to-fuel projects shouldn’t be considered recycling

Listen to the article 5 minutes This audio is generated automatically. Please let us know …